Tanya Bickley Enterprises: Brings You Robinson Frank Adu, The Griot,

Lecture Bureau Entertainment Agency

Tanya Bickley EnterprisesRobinson Frank Adu

ROBINSON FRANK ADU in

“THE GRIOT”

On a very sparse stage, Adu, a statuesque six-foot tall man

stands center stage, dressed in a flowing black and gold robe

which cover his black silk shirt and trousers. On his head, he

wears an African Kufae, neatly placed atop his salt and pepper

hair. A griot is traditionally a West African storyteller,

the keeper of the people’s history, a personification of the oral

tradition. As a griot, Adu’s task is to tell that history to the

current generation.

And he does so, poetically, graphically, majestically, comically

in a play whose parts are entitled “Home,” “Middle Passage,” “The

Wilderness,” “Urban Chaos,” and “Homecoming,” called by Adu

African-America’s return to its original culture.

From the opening, “Hymn to the Sun” written anonymously

during the reign of Pharaoh Akhenaton and considered in some

circles to be the first recorded example of African poetry to the

final “Lumumba’s Last Message,” written by Patrice Emery Lumumba,

Adu through the poetry of blacks reveals the history of blacks.

The poets and writers are D.T. Niane, Valente Malangatana,

Matei Markwei, Emmanuel Boundzekie-Dongala, Abdillaahi Muuse,

translations from the Yorube by C. M. Bowra, Faarah Nuur, Frances

Ernest Kobina Parkes, James D. Rubadiri, Robert Hayden, Oscar

Brown, Jr., Paul Lawrence Dunbar, Richard Wright, Sterling Brown,

Marcus Garvey, Robinson Frank Adu, Gwendolyn Brooks, Langston

Hughes, James Weldon Johnson, Nikki Giovanni, Abioseh Nicol,

Frank Aig-Imoukhuede, and B. W. Vilakazi.

As an actor Robinson Frank Adu has been critically acclaimed

by

his peers, by critics and other theatre professionals. Through

his talent and utter commitment to “bring to the fore” – with

loving and honest illumination – the complex lives of African American

peoples, Adu has helped shape modern black theatre

alongside the most gifted playwrights, directors and actors who

have made ground breaking contributions to black “theatre language.”

Robinson Frank Adu’s theatre credits include Every

Night

When

the

Sun

Goes

Down,

No

Place

To

Be

Somebody,

My

Sister,

My

Sister,

Slaveship,

Joe

Turner’s

Come

and Gone, Two Trains

Running, Two Black Men–No Singing, No Dancing. His film and

television credits include Malcolm X, Law and Order, and New York Undercover. With The Griot, Robinson Frank Adu seeks, with humility, to

honor his ancestors, to share eloquent black words, thoughts and

lyricism, and to help “light the path” for all sons and daughters, of the future.

|

|

|

|

|

Aly Chiman

Aly Chiman is a Blogger & Reporter at AlyChiTech.com which covers a wide variety of topics from local news from digital world fashion and beauty . AlyChiTech covers the top notch content from the around the world covering a wide variety of topics. Aly is currently studying BS Mass Communication at University.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.